FerryBox

FerryBox is an operational method to continuously measure physical, chemical and biological parameters on board of ships-of-opportunity. FerryBox is a through-flow system installed on board of a ship-of-opportunity (ferry, cargo ship or research vessel) to measure automatically, continuously and unattended a series of important marine parameters. The sensors installed offer the opportunity to measure physical (salinity, temperature, turbidity, …), chemical (nutrients, pH, CO2, DOC –humic compounds, oxygen) and biological (chlorophyll, phytoplankton composition, dominant/harmful species) parameters.

A FerryBox system is triggered by the position of the ship, and closed just before harbor entrances to prevent pollution of the system. A flushing system enables cleaning of the system and prevents biofouling during stay in a harbor. Data obtained are stored in a computer whereas satellite connection enables sending data to the respective institute and control the management of the system.

First steps into a European system of FerryBox systems were taken during an EU-funded project (2002-2005). Since then a sustainable cooperation between the original and new partners has been established. Currently FerryBox systems are installed on a network of European FerryBox contributors, mainly coastal and marine research institutions and national environmental agencies.

Detailed information on all aspects of the system including technical details, sensor types, application, costs and maintenance were published in EuroGOOS publication No.25 , 2007: FerryBox: From on-line oceanographic observations to environmental information.

FerryBox network is operating as a EuroGOOS Task Team. The website is available at: www.ferrybox.org

List of Members

Co-chairs

  • Andrew King, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Norway
  • Anna Willstrand Wranne, Voice of the Ocean, Stockholm

Members

  • Thanos Gkritzalis, Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ), Belgium
  • Andre Cattrijsse, Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ), Belgium
  • Urmas Lips, Tallinn University of Technology, Marine Systems Institute (MSI), Estonia
  • Jukka Seppälä, Finnish Environment, Finland 
  • Ludovic Drouineau, French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (Ifremer), France
  • Wilhelm (Willi) Petersen, Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon (Hereon)
  • Franciscus Colijn, Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon (Hereon)
  • George Petihakis, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR), Greece
  • Costas Frangoulis, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR), Greece
  • Manolis Ntoumas, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (HCMR), Greece
  • Henning Wehde, Institute of Marine Research (IMR), Norway
  • Andrew King, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Norway
  • Kai Sorensen, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Norway
  • Gonzalo Gonzales Nuevo, Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO), Spain
  • Patrick Gorringe, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), Sweden
  • Bengt Karlson, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), Sweden
  • Anna Willstrand Wranne, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), Sweden
  • Kate Collingridge, Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas), UK
  • Miguel Piecho-Santos, Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera (IPMA), Portugal
  • Yoana G. Voynova, Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon, Germany

EuroGOOS Facilitation:

  • Deniz Karaca, European Global Ocean Observing System (EuroGOOS), Belgium

Documents